Paths to Addiction Treatment Fraught With Barriers; Misinformed Expectations Can Set Up Disappointment

(Chicago) – For people in need of addiction treatment, and for families struggling to find help for a loved one, the barriers can be overwhelming.

Desperation can lead families to fall prey to unsavory treatment marketing practices, reported Alison Knopf in the June 13 edition of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly. The issue’s lead article describes how a Florida treatment center targets Illinois patients who have out-of-network insurance, which has no contract-based cost limitations.

TASC’s Peter Palanca was one of the experts quoted:

“These are predatory marketing tactics,” said Peter Palanca, executive vice president and chief operating officer of TASC, based in Chicago. “I don’t think there’s any question about that,” he told ADAW. “To prey on families who are scared to death, grasping at straws, terrified about their son or daughter dying” is wrong, he said.

Knopf also spoke with Illinois experts Kathie Kane-Willis, director of the Illinois Consortium on Drug Policy at Roosevelt University; Jud DeLoss, external counsel for the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association, and Phil Eaton, president and CEO of Rosecrance, all of whom expressed concern over certain business models and tactics that take advantage of uninformed consumers. The treatment center in Florida, for example, employs a full-time Midwest outreach coordinator, making Illinois the center’s main referral source.

“You shouldn’t have to get on a plane to get treatment,” advised TASC President Pam Rodriguez. “Recovery doesn’t happen magically in a program far away from home. It’s a long process involving changes in physiology, changes in behavior, changes in relationships, and changes in many other aspects of a person’s life. Ultimately, it happens day by day, in the community where people live and work and learn.”

Common barriers to entering treatment can be external influences, such as lack of access, funding, or time, or internal factors, such as stigma, depression, and personal beliefs. These barriers may be compounded by variables such as insurance coverage, geography, race and ethnicity, genderage, and other factors.

Misinformed expectations about treatment also contribute to people not getting to into treatment, or not getting the treatment that works for them, said Rodriguez.

The biggest misconception about treatment is that it’s going to magically fix you,” she said. “People often have wrong expectations about what’s going to happen as a result of going to treatment. You don’t go to treatment to get fixed. You go to treatment to learn entirely new ways to live your life. And that can be scary and difficult.

“You need to find treatment that feels right for you,” she added. “If your gut says it isn’t right, it probably isn’t. Just as with any other health issue, you might go through a few doctors before you find one that works for you. It’s the same with treatment.”

The Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse publishes a county-by-county list of substance use disorder treatment programs. Nationwide, call or visit the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at 1-800-662-HELP.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s