Delegation of Ugandan Juvenile Justice Leaders Visits TASC

(Chicago) – A delegation of juvenile justice leaders from Uganda visited TASC on September 24 for an exchange of ideas and strategies for serving youth who come in contact with the justice system.

As part of the International Visitor Leadership Program (IVLP) of the U.S. Department of State, the delegation of six leaders representing the Ugandan high courts, public prosecutions, and non-government organizations (NGOs) visited TASC to learn about justice reform, community-based alternatives to detention, and reentry programs.

The discussion, led by George Williams, vice president of community and government affairs for TASC, highlighted key approaches for diversion and reentry programs, as well as common challenges in providing opportunities for youth.

“The most important thing we do is engage with the youth,” said Anthony Harden, TASC juvenile justice services administrator. He emphasized the critical role and dedication of TASC care coordinators like Breanna Hollie, who co-presented with Harden. “We try to find something positive that youth will connect with.”

For instance, Harden noted, if a youth is doodling while TASC is conducting an assessment, that’s an opportunity to find out about the youth’s interest in art.

“In that case, we’ll find resources on art to support their interest,” said Harden. “We’ll learn where they grew up, what they want to do, where their strengths are… And we’ll connect them with mentors. We help youth understand that we work with the justice system, but we’re not the justice system. Our role is to be there for the youth, to be their advocates.”

TASC’s services for youth include prevention programs, diversion alternatives, court services, and post-detention reentry.

“We are committed to ensuring that there are alternatives at every point in the system,” said Alicia Osborne, director of operations for TASC.

The discussion highlighted opportunities such as strength-based approaches and balanced and restorative justice (BARJ), as well common challenges for youth who come in conflict with the law, whether in the U.S. or Uganda. Many come from environments of poverty, where family and social structures have been weakened, and where opportunities for work and education are lacking. In Uganda, delegates noted, in addition to facing poverty, children may be detained hundreds of kilometers from home, where they are far from family and may encounter language barriers as well.

While challenges are ever-present, the Ugandan delegates and TASC leaders shared a commitment to solutions that give youth and their families the opportunity to succeed.

“We can’t necessarily change the community environment,” acknowledged Williams. “But we can help our clients develop the protective skills and mindset to help them as they navigate back to their community. We help them find out, ‘What is my personal capital so I can change my relationship with the community?’”

The International Visitor Leadership Program is the U.S. Department of State’s premier professional exchange program. Past participants in the program include 35 current and 300 former chiefs of state or heads of government. In partnership with IVLP, the visit was facilitated by WorldChicago, a nonprofit organization that promotes citizen diplomacy and international exchange.

 

Ugandan delegation visits TASC (24 Sept. 2018). Back row, left to right: Daphne Baille, TASC; Anthony Harden, TASC; Marion Sunday Ben-Bella; Directorate of Public Prosecutions, Uganda; Jacquelyn Akol Okui, Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Uganda; Judge Margaret Mutonyi, Republic of Uganda; George Williams, TASC; Breanna Hollie, TASC; Alicia Osborne, TASC. Front row, left to right: Samali Wakooli, Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Uganda; Winfred Adukule Meuter, Free Child Uganda; Lillian Alum-Omara, Directorate of Public Prosecutions, Uganda.

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Anthony Harden, TASC Youth Services Administrator, Receives IADDA Award for Distinguished Service

Anthony Harden, recipient of IADDA’s 2014 C. Vincent Bakeman Memorial Award, is congratulated by his wife, Gloria, and TASC team members. Left to right: Alisa Montgomery-Webb, Gloria Harden, Anthony Harden, Maxie Knighten, Alicia Kusiak, and Janelle Prueter.

Anthony Harden, recipient of IADDA’s 2014 Dr. C. Vincent Bakeman Memorial Award, with (left to right): Alisa Montgomery-Webb, TASC Youth Reentry Services Administrator; Gloria Harden; Maxie Knighten, TASC Juvenile Justice Services Team Leader; Alicia Kusiak, TASC Director of Cook County Services; and Janelle Prueter, TASC Vice President of Operations.

(Chicago) – Recognized for his tireless advocacy on behalf of youth and families in need of health services, TASC Youth Services Administrator Anthony Harden was honored September 4 by the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association (IADDA).

Harden received the 2014 Dr. C. Vincent Bakeman Memorial Award at the association’s annual conference in Lisle. IADDA presents the award each year in memory of Dr. Bakeman, a pioneer in the field of addiction prevention and treatment who envisioned a society where all people have equal access to these essential health services.

“Just to be nominated for the Dr. C. Vincent Bakeman Memorial Award is an honor,” said Harden, “but to be selected is humbling and overwhelming.”

Paying tribute to the award’s namesake, he said, “Dr. Bakeman’s vision and legacy are consistent with our mission at TASC, as well as with our partners here at IADDA – to educate the public that substance abuse is a health issue.”

Harden offered that Dr. Bakeman’s commitment to equal access to substance use treatment is closer to being realized, thanks to the Affordable Care Act. For example, TASC provides application assistance for individuals detained at the Cook County Jail, which “not only for the first time gives many access to health insurance for their general well-being, but also access to treatment for substance abuse and mental health issues,” said Harden. “This is how we honor the leadership and legacy of Dr. Bakeman – by advocating, not just treatment for those who could afford it, but also treatment for everyone in need.”

He added that he would be remiss not to mention Dr. Bakeman’s insistence in advocating for all cultures, in particular for people of color.

“Years ago I heard Vince speak in Springfield at the Black Caucus convention,” recalled Harden. “He stated that one of the best models to address substance abuse is the 12-step program – but that it was designed for white, middle class, employed men. He advocated for communities of color to develop their own culturally-specific approaches and provide treatment and services to their own within their own communities. In other words, we need to make 12 steps inclusive; we need to make them fit who we’re serving – the unemployed, females, the homeless, the uninsured and the disfranchised. I think Dr. Bakeman would be proud of how far we have come today. But the work is not finished and I have no doubt my colleagues will not rest until it is so.”

TASC President Pamela Rodriguez presented the award to Harden, honoring his dedicated service and compassion for clients and staff.

“We are so proud to recognize your work, Anthony,” said Rodriguez. “Your heart goes into everything you do, and we see that in your quiet leadership and steady purpose in giving kids in the justice system a fair chance to succeed.”

“As Anthony’s colleague and friend, it is a pleasure to recognize his many achievements,” added TASC Executive Vice President Peter Palanca, who served as IADDA board chair from 2010 to 2012. “Anthony cares profoundly about creating opportunities for youth so they can grow up safely and participate in society in healthy and meaningful ways.”

Harden extended appreciation to his colleagues, many of whom were in attendance to celebrate his accomplishments, and his wife, Gloria, for her unwavering support. Thanking IADDA board members and CEO, Sara Howe, as well as TASC’s executive team for their advocacy on behalf of clients, families, and staff, Harden offered special appreciation for his juvenile services team, led by Maxie Knighten. “They are the true frontline soldiers and without them none of this is possible.”

With more than 20 years of dedicated service at TASC, Harden leads the agency’s services for the Juvenile Drug Court in Cook County, as well as TASC’s programs in partnership with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. He serves on several committees and boards, including the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Executive Committee, the Austin Community Coalition for Healthy Lifestyles, and the UIC PHAT (Preventing HIV/AIDS Among Teens) Community Advisory Board.

Established in 1967, IADDA is a statewide advocacy organization that represents more than 50 organizations across Illinois that provide substance use disorder prevention, treatment, and recovery services. TASC is a member agency of IADDA.